Summertime Madness (Photoshoots I’ve loved #24)

This week it’s an editorial entitled “Summertime Madness”, which was styled by David Nyiri. Nyiri is stylist extraordinaire, he has styled shoots for everyone from Marie Claire to Vodafone. This shoot looks like the pages of a fashion editor‘s sketchbook, with annotations in the corners of each page. This creates a juxtaposition with the toughness of the model, her clothes and the childish writing at the top of each photo. It celebrates youth and urban culture with vibrant colours and young models with youthful energy in each photograph.

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All images from Trendhunter, click the images to go to the webpage.

What do you think of these? Are they too gaudy?

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“Famous Last Words” Rhett & Link (video I’ve loved)

This week, I’m doing something a little different by showcasing a video that I’ve loved, rather then a photograph.
Rhett & Link are a comedy duo comprised of Rhett McLaughlin and Link Neal. They are musicians and filmmakers, also (a bit like Flight of the Concords). I first heard of them through their “Thoughful Guy” rap video (I’ve written a blog post on here about it, do a search ;)). This brilliant video is “29 things you should never say” aka “Famous Last Words”. The editing is quick, the viewer doesn’t have time to see what happens to the pair after one of them, for example says “Let’s do that thing where you drive a car at me, and I jump over it”. In this, the viewer makes their own mind up about what happens to the subjects in the video.

What did you think?

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Corpus – Alejandra Figueroa – Photoshoots I’ve loved #22

This week it’s “Corpus” by Alejandra Figueroa. I was given this book for my birthday and I’m absolutely in love with it.

Alejandra Figueroa was born in Mexico but moved to Paris in 1992. Her work is mainly concerned with sculpture, stained glass and architecture. She was commissioned to photograph the statues of the world’s greatest musuems.
This almost-A3-sized hardback book is a study of the human form. It is the fruit of several years of labour. It features abstract imagery of the beauty of the nude figure; parts of bodies: hands, feet, parts of faces. The images are presented in such a way that the viewer thinks they are viewing real nudes, flesh doesn’t look like stone. In this way, Figeroa acts as sort of an “anti” Medusa figure with her camera: instead of turning people to stone with it, she is turning stone, human. This book is a beautiful monograph of fine-art abstract imagery.

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All images from Alejandra Figueroa.fr. Click on the image to go to the webpage

What do you think of them? Are they “too abstract”?

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Broken Flowers by Jon Shireman (Photoshoots I’ve loved #20)

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These photos are from Jon Shireman’s “Broken Flowers“. He soaked the flowers in liquid nitrogen and then shattered them for his 2010 series.

What do you think of them? Is it too weird a concept?

All photos from Laughing Squid, click on the photo to go to the webpage

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Geraldine Lamanna – Powder Dance (Photoshoots I’ve loved #19)

I’ve been so behind on my blogging schedule at the moment, I’ve been so busy. *Regularly scheduled posting will resume shortly* (haha). Anyway, apologies and bad jokes aside, this week I’m going to talk about “Powder Dance” by Geraldine Lamanna. This series of photographs is amazing. She photographed dancers and used powder to accentuate the power and movement of the dance itself. Lamanna coated a dance instructor and her students with powder and let them show their moves to the camera. The resulting photographs are supposed to show “echoes” of movement. Compositionally, these photographs are perfect, the composition draws you in to the middle of the frame, to the dancer’s face. The lighting is great, spotlights illuminate the dancers and the powder separately so the viewer can see both equally well.ImageImageImageImageImage

What do you think of these?

All images from Peta Pixel, click on the image to go to the webpage.

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Photoshoots I’ve loved #16

This week it’s Janne Parviainen’s images of rooms light-painted (is that even a word? Let me know in the comments…) with one LED light. These are amazing, they are all done in-camera, with no post-processing at all. Doing what he calls “Light typography”, he traces over the room’s surfaces with an LED while the camera’s shutter is open (which is what light painting is, essentially ;)). This images wouldn’t look out of place in the Tron universe.

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What do you think of them? Are they too much work for the result they give?

All images from Peta Pixel, click on the image to go to the webpage.

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Photoshoots I’ve loved #15

This week on the fifteenth post in my series on “photo-shoots I’ve loved”, its David Jordan’s long exposure, out of focus images of fireworks. I’m always fascinated by long-exposure photographs so I think these are amazing, they look like abstract paintings. (They wouldn’t look out-of-place on a gallery wall either – it’s the wannabe curator in me coming out!). The composition is perfect, the viewer is immediately drawn towards the middle of the photograph, to the centre of the firework.

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What do you think of them? Do you think they are too “arty”?

All images from Laughing Squid, click on the image to go to the webpage

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Photoshoots I’ve loved #13

Hello again, I’m back to continue my series on inspiring and incredible images. This one is “Beauty School Drop-out” by Michael David Adams. The images are gaudy, with candy-couloured hair and strong makeup. This is reminiscent of Charlotte Free or even Helena Bonham-Carter in some images. The tight crop of most of the images adds to the overall composition, making you really look at the model’s hair and makeup.

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Also…

Watch this space, I might have an extra something-something for you during the week (or even later tonight;)).
All images from Trend Hunter, click the image to go to the webpage

What do you think? Is the makeup with the hair too much?

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Monday post series #9: photoshoots I’ve loved

This week on the “Photo-shoots I’ve loved” series is “Wahkan, An Other Afghanistan” shot by French photographers Fabrice Najari and Cedric Houin. This is a series concentrating on Wahkan, a province in Afghanistan. The photographers first photographed their subjects with Impossible Project instant film and then handed them the Polaroid to photograph them again. The photographs of the subjects themselves are in black and white, while the Polaroid is in color. This emphasizes the photograph and, I think, the fact that most of these people have never been photographed before, or have even seen a camera. Adding to this is the fact that in some photos, the subjects are looking away or hiding their faces as though embarrassed or afraid, others stare straight into the lens determinedly.

What do you think of these images? Is it fair that some subjects look physically uncomfortable having their photograph taken and the photographers proceeded with it anyway?

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Tuesday post series #8: videos I’ve loved (Baldwin S/S13 Lookbook)

 

http://vimeo.com/46405883#

Not much to say about this really. It’s everything a fashion film / look-book film should be: edgy, focused on the models and clothes and color graded to perfection. Watch and be amazed