Process #2

My degree project was a book documenting the Irish Diaspora’s journeys from Ireland to England. I photographed and interviewed people in the various Irish centers around London: the London Irish Center, the Luton Irish Forum and the South London Irish Association. The book itself was hand-printed and bound but my bookmaking skills are very lacking! As such, I enlisted the help of my friend Chloe (a 2015 UAL Wimbledon graduate in Print and Time-based Media) to help me fix the binding and structure of the book itself.

Chloe won the Wandle Studio Prize for 2015/16 so she has use of a studio space at Merton Abbey Mills where she runs an “alternative book-makery” called Object Book.

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Original book
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How it stood
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Lying flat

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Attempt at attching the covers

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I attempted to attach the covers and put too much glue on the front
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The binding was too loose so pages would move
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Cutting the binding off each folio
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Placing the first cover
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Sewing the first section
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Tying a kettle stitch at the end
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Sewing the fourth folio to the third with a kettle stitch
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The cross stitch was made by putting the thread through two layers of thread on the folios and making a X shape and tying a kettle stitich
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Exposed biding
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Kettle stitches at the end of each folio

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Flattening in the nipping press

PS: I’m doing photo-book narrative workshops at Object Book on the 6th of August. More details to follow.

CUE at ArtsLav

On Friday last I had the privilege of attending and photographing an exhibition organised and curated by fellow students from Wimbledon College of Art, Katarina Rankovic and Tahmina Ahkmedov, co-curated by Kosha Hussain. CUE, held at ArtsLav in Kennington, south London, is an exhibition of painting, installation, video and mixed media work. Housed in a Victorian ex-lavatory, ArtsLav was an unusual choice of venue but worked amazingly well; with work hanging off toilet cubical doors and behind cubical doors and on the walls. The atmosphere was decidedly 1920s with Reinhardt jazz music and candles dotting the narrow rectangular space.

The rest of my photographs from the private view can be found by clicking on the photograph.

The work is on show now until the 6th of June at ArtsLav, 180 Kennington Lane, London, SE11 4UZ.

 

 

Creative rambling

I feel as though every time I’m blogging here, I have to apologise for not blogging here sooner. Or more regularly. I shouldn’t feel like this though because this platform (as big as its gotten in my head) is only a very tiny space on the vast internet so I’m only writing to a a very minuscule set of people. That’s not to say I don’t appreciate the audience I’ve built up, though. Anyway…

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about art, creativity and new media. Is art only “art” when someone else sees it? Is it an intangible thing unless it’s seen by eyes other than your own? Is an artwork a conversation between the artist and the audience?
Is creativity as we see it a finite resource? Can you “run out” of creativity? Can you hone your creativity? What do you have to do to keep inspiration flowing?
These are the kinds of questions that I mull over because, if creativity really is finite and needs to be continuously honed and sharpened, what happens if I run out of creativity? What happens if I don’t create for a long time? Do I cease to be creative?

Is the creative process linear? As in A -> B, where B is creativity? Or can you have non-linear creativity? As in, A -> B, where B is two different outcomes. Is creativity cyclical? What does this creative process look like? Are there certain things you can do to become more creative; to increase and hone your creativity?  If you do X, Y, Z, are you creative?

My own “creative process” (even though I don’t know if this process is linear, non-linear or even cyclical), I write down ideas in a Moleskine notebook and make a mind map of all the different things I could do with this idea (if you want me to write a more in-depth post about my creative process, just say); I gather images and references from the internet and magazines and make a moodboard. After this, I make a list of the key images I want to capture and look at how I want the model to look (makeup, clothes etc). I think organise an MUA and an assistant as needed and I’m ready to shoot.

How are you creative? Do you think creativity can be sharpened?

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A Short Way From Here

I know you all are sick of me apologising for being a bad blogger so I’m not going to :) Instead, I’m going to let you look at my new book!
It’s a photobook called “A Short Way From Here” and it’s published on Blurb books. This is the result of a photographic project on the seascape and documenting it in an unfamiliar way.
Hope you like it :)
What did you think? Is it too abstract?
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Malta 2013

During February, I attended a “creative retreat” in Malta with my friend Kate, her husband and six other artists or “creatives” as Kate liked to call them! While we were there, we had forums on our own work, where we presented the work we had done during the day (each day we were given a word to concentrate on and make art about); visits from local artists and we worked on making the art we had made into a book. The book is finished and hopefully going to be available through Blurb soon!

Now, the photos!

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I probably don’t need to tell you that: All images are copyright Aisling Keavey, all right reserved. Photos can only be used with written permission.

Have you ever been to Malta? What did you think?

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Corpus – Alejandra Figueroa – Photoshoots I’ve loved #22

This week it’s “Corpus” by Alejandra Figueroa. I was given this book for my birthday and I’m absolutely in love with it.

Alejandra Figueroa was born in Mexico but moved to Paris in 1992. Her work is mainly concerned with sculpture, stained glass and architecture. She was commissioned to photograph the statues of the world’s greatest musuems.
This almost-A3-sized hardback book is a study of the human form. It is the fruit of several years of labour. It features abstract imagery of the beauty of the nude figure; parts of bodies: hands, feet, parts of faces. The images are presented in such a way that the viewer thinks they are viewing real nudes, flesh doesn’t look like stone. In this way, Figeroa acts as sort of an “anti” Medusa figure with her camera: instead of turning people to stone with it, she is turning stone, human. This book is a beautiful monograph of fine-art abstract imagery.

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All images from Alejandra Figueroa.fr. Click on the image to go to the webpage

What do you think of them? Are they “too abstract”?

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Unless You Will issue 24

Unless You Will issue 24

Blogging about this today, it’s an Australian online photo magazine. This issue is concerned with landscape photography and how artists connect to the land and photograph it.

The issue features 10 photographer’s practices on landscape photography and a really nice quote from Seneca in “Letters From A Stoic” –

“Are you telling me

not to investigate

the natural world?

Are you trying to bar
me from the whole
of it and restrict me
to a part of it?
Am I not to inquire
into the identity of
the artist who created
that universe?
Or the process by
which the huge mass
became subject to
law and order?
Or the nature of the
one who collected
the things that were
scattered apart, sorted
apart the things that
were commingled,
and when all things
lay in formless chaos
allotted them their
individual shapes?
Or the source of the
light (is it fire or is it
something brighter?)
Am I supposed not
to inquire into this
sort of thing?”